"Sometimes when you tell the truth you have to walk alone" _Michael James Stone

“Sometimes when you tell the truth you have to walk alone”

The Failure of Fundamentalism

(in the Classroom)

This is not one of my favorite subjects to write about, so when God tells me to, I am more than reluctant, I just don’t want to. Why? Because most of the time, if a lie is convenient, people would rather believe in a lie.

There is a lie that is occuring in Christianity that has gone on long enough, a majority of people believe it is true and are willing to re-write History to distort the facts. If we as Christians were to participate in that lie, God would judge us.

We dare not. Why? Because as you begin to “re-write” history, even in the name of God, or in the name of Patriotism, or in any name with which you have to “lie” to do it. You are creating a religion of Patriotic Christianism and like Christian Zionism, neither are about Jesus or the Truth.

Christianism like Catholicism of old, is now putting a “spin” on History.

To combat Humanism, Christianism raises the spectre of “God and Country” as a banner to hide a disturbing trend In America. It starts with this Idea:

“Our Founding Fathers were Christians”

It sounds good, and while a fair share of our country was founded by Christian Men and Women, when you look closer, you would most likely call a fair share of them “cults” by todays standards. Quite a few more, like Benjamin Franklin, were Humanist. While I am sure God intervened, there is a massive counter-culture on two extremes going after history to re-write it: 1) Says they are Humanist. 2) The others says Christianist. Neither are telling the truth about America and our “Founding Fathers.”

The closer you look at history, heroes, celebrities, movie stars, politicians, Christian Ministers, Founding Fathers or TV Celebrities:  more you realize, agendas are not absolute in America. Nor is perfection found in man.  While Humanism, Scientism, Socialism, Fundamentalism, Christianism, Zionisma all are worthy causes to those who adhere to it.

God wants Nothing to do with any of them.

What God says is fact. He never said, nor will He, In the Begninng I Created America. There are powerful Christian workings that are moving in that direction and they are an abomination. God gave us a history lesson on humanity all contained in one book and one statement God said about all of Man. There is non righteous, no not one. That means, No Virginia there is no Santa Claus and while making American Founding Fathers look like saints, like Santa, a Lie is still a Lie.

Jesus is Lord of Lord and King Over America.

As I once told a gathering of Christians who wanted to “promote” the idea that God founded democracy in America and Free Enterprise as “His Will”. After “some” redress of Historical Facts from the Bible, World History Facts, American History Facts and Religion in America Facts I said:

“You can take Democracy and Shove it”

Jesus is King Over America.

“Sometimes when you tell the truth you have to walk alone”

I never forgot those “zealots” thirty years ago and I see now why. In the Last Generation as Fundamentalism is failing as A.W. Tozer, Francis Schaeffer, and many leading Christian Authors warned.

To save fundamental Christianity in America, we will sacrifice facts in order to prevent the “World” from polluting our “version” of Christian 101.

I saw that as Billy Graham, Greg Laurie, Rick Warren, Chuck Smith, James Dobson, many many world leading authorities and Christian leaders, become marginalized by those who in the name of “pure Christianism” labeled these Men WITH God as False.

Jesus is King Over America.

It doesn’t matter to those who recklessly did this. They began the current heresy that denies any authority over themselves as they state “for the good of “biblical fidelity” they are the arbitrators of the “new puritanism”. The codification of the “literal bible movement” that if the truth be known: No One Is That Literal. (Maybe me but no one else comes close, and I mean literal in all the literal reality it means).

These “self-proclaimed” are the talk radio celebrities, who even men like Glen Beck stated that a Piece of paper called the Constitution was “divinely” inspired and “a perfect” work, even exagerating it using descriptions only reserved for the Bible. Since Mr Beck is a Mormon, I recognize when he goes on to cult like statements because he does not in fact know Jesus as Personal to the reality of having conversation with God on a two way basis.

Yet, Beck, is a telling force for Christianism. And He is not a Christian. He talks the talk. He sounds good. He states Christian Themes, but salvation is not a Mormon leading us.

Jesus is King Over America.

Jesus is King of the Jews, and he became King of all Kings. What He Says is True. The rest is ManTalk, like TalkRadio, BlogTalk, ReligoTalk, PoliticoTalk.

It won’t get you saved.

Read this article to remind you Jesus once said about a Non-Christian who came to Him. He told a story about the centurion and the servant to honor Him, but it also reminds us, sometimes the Sinner may be telling the Truth, rather than the Saint.

How Christian Were the Founders?

By RUSSELL SHORTO

LAST MONTH, A WEEK before the Senate seat of the liberal icon Edward M. Kennedy fell into Republican hands, his legacy suffered another blow that was perhaps just as damaging, if less noticed. It happened during what has become an annual spectacle in the culture wars.

Over two days, more than a hundred people — Christians, Jews, housewives, naval officers, professors; people outfitted in everything from business suits to military fatigues to turbans to baseball caps — streamed through the halls of the William B. Travis Building in Austin, Tex., waiting for a chance to stand before the semicircle of 15 high-backed chairs whose occupants made up the Texas State Board of Education. Each petitioner had three minutes to say his or her piece.

“Please keep César Chávez” was the message of an elderly Hispanic man with a floppy gray mustache.

“Sikhism is the fifth-largest religion in the world and should be included in the curriculum,” a woman declared.

Following the appeals from the public, the members of what is the most influential state board of education in the country, and one of the most politically conservative, submitted their own proposed changes to the new social-studies curriculum guidelines, whose adoption was the subject of all the attention — guidelines that will affect students around the country, from kindergarten to 12th grade, for the next 10 years. Gail Lowe — who publishes a twice-a-week newspaper when she is not grappling with divisive education issues — is the official chairwoman, but the meeting was dominated by another member. Don McLeroy, a small, vigorous man with a shiny pate and bristling mustache, proposed amendment after amendment on social issues to the document that teams of professional educators had drawn up over 12 months, in what would have to be described as a single-handed display of archconservative political strong-arming.

McLeroy moved that Margaret Sanger, the birth-control pioneer, be included because she “and her followers promoted eugenics,” that language be inserted about Ronald Reagan’s “leadership in restoring national confidence” following Jimmy Carter’s presidency and that students be instructed to “describe the causes and key organizations and individuals of the conservative resurgence of the 1980s and 1990s, including Phyllis Schlafly, the Contract With America, the Heritage Foundation, the Moral Majority and the National Rifle Association.” The injection of partisan politics into education went so far that at one point another Republican board member burst out in seemingly embarrassed exasperation, “Guys, you’re rewriting history now!” Nevertheless, most of McLeroy’s proposed amendments passed by a show of hands.

Finally, the board considered an amendment to require students to evaluate the contributions of significant Americans. The names proposed included Thurgood Marshall, Billy Graham, Newt Gingrich, William F. Buckley Jr., Hillary Rodham Clinton and Edward Kennedy. All passed muster except Kennedy, who was voted down.

This is how history is made — or rather, how the hue and cry of the present and near past gets lodged into the long-term cultural memory or else is allowed to quietly fade into an inaudible whisper. Public education has always been a battleground between cultural forces; one reason that Texas’ school-board members find themselves at the very center of the battlefield is, not surprisingly, money. The state’s $22 billion education fund is among the largest educational endowments in the country. Texas uses some of that money to buy or distribute a staggering 48 million textbooks annually — which rather strongly inclines educational publishers to tailor their products to fit the standards dictated by the Lone Star State. California is the largest textbook market, but besides being bankrupt, it tends to be so specific about what kinds of information its students should learn that few other states follow its lead. Texas, on the other hand, was one of the first states to adopt statewide curriculum guidelines, back in 1998, and the guidelines it came up with (which are referred to as TEKS — pronounced “teaks” — for Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills) were clear, broad and inclusive enough that many other states used them as a model in devising their own. And while technology is changing things, textbooks — printed or online —are still the backbone of education.

The cultural roots of the Texas showdown may be said to date to the late 1980s, when, in the wake of his failed presidential effort, the Rev. Pat Robertson founded the Christian Coalition partly on the logic that conservative Christians should focus their energies at the grass-roots level. One strategy was to put candidates forward for state and local school-board elections — Robertson’s protégé, Ralph Reed, once said, “I would rather have a thousand school-board members than one president and no school-board members” — and Texas was a beachhead. Since the election of two Christian conservatives in 2006, there are now seven on the Texas state board who are quite open about the fact that they vote in concert to advance a Christian agenda. “They do vote as a bloc,” Pat Hardy, a board member who considers herself a conservative Republican but who stands apart from the Christian faction, told me. “They work consciously to pull one more vote in with them on an issue so they’ll have a majority.”

This year’s social-studies review has drawn the most attention for the battles over what names should be included in the roll call of history. But while ignoring Kennedy and upgrading Gingrich are significant moves, something more fundamental is on the agenda. The one thing that underlies the entire program of the nation’s Christian conservative activists is, naturally, religion. But it isn’t merely the case that their Christian orientation shapes their opinions on gay marriage, abortion and government spending. More elementally, they hold that the United States was founded by devout Christians and according to biblical precepts. This belief provides what they consider not only a theological but also, ultimately, a judicial grounding to their positions on social questions. When they proclaim that the United States is a “Christian nation,” they are not referring to the percentage of the population that ticks a certain box in a survey or census but to the country’s roots and the intent of the founders.

The Christian “truth” about America’s founding has long been taught in Christian schools, but not beyond. Recently, however — perhaps out of ire at what they see as an aggressive, secular, liberal agenda in Washington and perhaps also because they sense an opening in the battle, a sudden weakness in the lines of the secularists — some activists decided that the time was right to try to reshape the history that children in public schools study. Succeeding at this would help them toward their ultimate goal of reshaping American society. As Cynthia Dunbar, another Christian activist on the Texas board, put it, “The philosophy of the classroom in one generation will be the philosophy of the government in the next.”

Imet Don McLeroy last November in a dental office — that is to say, his dental office — in a professional complex in the Brazos Valley city of Bryan, not far from the sprawling campus of Texas A&M University. The buzz of his hygienist at work sounded through the thin wall separating his office from the rest of the suite. McLeroy makes no bones about the fact that his professional qualifications have nothing to do with education. “I’m a dentist, not a historian,” he said. “But I’m fascinated by history, so I’ve read a lot.”

Indeed, dentistry is only a job for McLeroy; his real passions are his faith and the state board of education. He has been a member of the board since 1999 and served as its chairman from 2007 until he was demoted from that role by the State Senate last May because of concerns over his religious views. Until now those views have stood McLeroy in good stead with the constituents of his district, which meanders from Houston to Dallas and beyond, but he is currently in a heated re-election battle in the Republican primary, which takes place March 2.

McLeroy is a robust, cheerful and inexorable man, whose personality is perhaps typified by the framed letter T on the wall of his office, which he earned as a “yell leader” (Texas A&M nomenclature for cheerleader) in his undergraduate days in the late 1960s. “I consider myself a Christian fundamentalist,” he announced almost as soon as we sat down. He also identifies himself as a young-earth creationist who believes that the earth was created in six days, as the book of Genesis has it, less than 10,000 years ago. He went on to explain how his Christian perspective both governs his work on the state board and guides him in the current effort to adjust American-history textbooks to highlight the role of Christianity. “Textbooks are mostly the product of the liberal establishment, and they’re written with the idea that our religion and our liberty are in conflict,” he said. “But Christianity has had a deep impact on our system. The men who wrote the Constitution were Christians who knew the Bible. Our idea of individual rights comes from the Bible. The Western development of the free-market system owes a lot to biblical principles.”

For McLeroy, separation of church and state is a myth perpetrated by secular liberals. “There are two basic facts about man,” he said. “He was created in the image of God, and he is fallen. You can’t appreciate the founding of our country without realizing that the founders understood that. For our kids to not know our history, that could kill a society. That’s why to me this is a huge thing.”

“This” — the Texas board’s moves to bring Jesus into American history — has drawn anger in places far removed from the board members’ constituencies. (Samples of recent blog headlines on the topic: “Don McLeroy Wants Your Children to Be Stupid” and “Can We Please Mess With Texas?”) The issue of Texas’ influence is a touchy one in education circles. With some parents and educators elsewhere leery of a right-wing fifth column invading their schools, people in the multibillion textbook industry try to play down the state’s sway. “It’s not a given that Texas’ curriculum translates into other states,” says Jay Diskey, executive director of the school division for the Association of American Publishers, which represents most of the major companies. But Tom Barber, who worked as the head of social studies at the three biggest textbook publishers before running his own editorial company, says, “Texas was and still is the most important and most influential state in the country.” And James Kracht, a professor at Texas A&M’s college of education and a longtime player in the state’s textbook process, told me flatly, “Texas governs 46 or 47 states.”

Every year for the last few years, Texas has put one subject area in its TEKS up for revision. Each year has brought a different controversy, and Don McLeroy has been at the center of most of them. Last year, in its science re-evaluation, the board lunged into the evolution/creationism/intelligent-design debate. The conservative Christian bloc wanted to require science teachers to cover the “strengths and weaknesses” of the theory of evolution, language they used in the past as a tool to weaken the rationale for teaching evolution. The battle made headlines across the country; ultimately, the seven Christian conservatives were unable to pull another vote their way on that specific point, but the finished document nonetheless allows inroads to creationism.

The fallout from that fight cost McLeroy his position as chairman. “It’s the 21st century, and the rest of the known world accepts the teaching of evolution as science and creationism as religion, yet we continue to have this debate here,” Kathy Miller, president of the Texas Freedom Network, a watchdog group, says. “So the eyes of the nation were on this body, and people saw how ridiculous they appeared.” The State Legislature felt the ridicule. “You have a point of view, and you’re using this bully pulpit to take the rest of the state there,” Eliot Shapleigh, a Democratic state senator, admonished McLeroy during the hearing that led to his ouster. McLeroy remains unbowed and talked cheerfully to me about how, confronted with a statement supporting the validity of evolution that was signed by 800 scientists, he had proudly been able to “stand up to the experts.”

The idea behind standing up to experts is that the scientific establishment has been withholding information from the public that would show flaws in the theory of evolution and that it is guilty of what McLeroy called an “intentional neglect of other scientific possibilities.” Similarly, the Christian bloc’s notion this year to bring Christianity into the coverage of American history is not, from their perspective, revisionism but rather an uncovering of truths that have been suppressed. “I don’t know that what we’re doing is redefining the role of religion in America,” says Gail Lowe, who became chairwoman of the board after McLeroy was ousted and who is one of the seven conservative Christians. “Many of us recognize that Judeo-Christian principles were the basis of our country and that many of our founding documents had a basis in Scripture. As we try to promote a better understanding of the Constitution, federalism, the separation of the branches of government, the basic rights guaranteed in the Bill of Rights, I think it will become evident to students that the founders had a religious motivation.”

Plenty of people disagree with this characterization of the founders, including some who are close to the process in Texas. “I think the evidence indicates that the founding fathers did not intend this to be a Christian nation,” says James Kracht, who served as an expert adviser to the board in the textbook-review process. “They definitely believed in some form of separation of church and state.”

There is, however, one slightly awkward issue for hard-core secularists who would combat what they see as a Christian whitewashing of American history: the Christian activists have a certain amount of history on their side.

IN 1801, A GROUP of Baptist ministers in Danbury, Conn., wrote a letter to the new president, Thomas Jefferson, congratulating him on his victory. They also had a favor to ask. Baptists were a minority group, and they felt insecure. In the colonial period, there were two major Christian factions, both of which derived from England. The Congregationalists, in New England, had evolved from the Puritan settlers, and in the South and middle colonies, the Anglicans came from the Church of England. Nine colonies developed state churches, which were supported financially by the colonial governments and whose power was woven in with that of the governments. Other Christians — Lutherans, Baptists, Quakers — and, of course, those of other faiths were made unwelcome, if not persecuted outright.

There was a religious element to the American Revolution, which was so pronounced that you could just as well view the event in religious as in political terms. Many of the founders, especially the Southerners, were rebelling simultaneously against state-church oppression and English rule. The Connecticut Baptists saw Jefferson — an anti-Federalist who was bitterly opposed to the idea of establishment churches — as a friend. “Our constitution of government,” they wrote, “is not specific” with regard to a guarantee of religious freedoms that would protect them. Might the president offer some thoughts that, “like the radiant beams of the sun,” would shed light on the intent of the framers? In his reply, Jefferson said it was not the place of the president to involve himself in religion, and he expressed his belief that the First Amendment’s clauses — that the government must not establish a state religion (the so-called establishment clause) but also that it must ensure the free exercise of religion (what became known as the free-exercise clause) — meant, as far as he was concerned, that there was “a wall of separation between Church & State.”

This little episode, culminating in the famous “wall of separation” metaphor, highlights a number of points about teaching religion in American history. For one, it suggests — as the Christian activists maintain — how thoroughly the colonies were shot through with religion and how basic religion was to the cause of the revolutionaries. The period in the early- to mid-1700s, called the Great Awakening, in which populist evangelical preachers challenged the major denominations, is considered a spark for the Revolution. And if religion influenced democracy then, in the Second Great Awakening, decades later, the democratic fervor of the Revolution spread through the two mainline denominations and resulted in a massive growth of the sort of populist churches that typify American Christianity to this day.

Christian activists argue that American-history textbooks basically ignore religion — to the point that they distort history outright — and mainline religious historians tend to agree with them on this. “In American history, religion is all over the place, and wherever it appears, you should tell the story and do it appropriately,” says Martin Marty, emeritus professor at the University of Chicago, past president of the American Academy of Religion and the American Society of Church History and perhaps the unofficial dean of American religious historians. “The goal should be natural inclusion. You couldn’t tell the story of the Pilgrims or the Puritans or the Dutch in New York without religion.” Though conservatives would argue otherwise, James Kracht said the absence of religion is not part of a secularist agenda: “I don’t think religion has been purposely taken out of U.S. history, but I do think textbook companies have been cautious in discussing religious beliefs and possibly getting in trouble with some groups.”

Some conservatives claim that earlier generations of textbooks were frank in promoting America as a Christian nation. It might be more accurate to say that textbooks of previous eras portrayed leaders as generally noble, with strong personal narratives, undergirded by faith and patriotism. As Frances FitzGerald showed in her groundbreaking 1979 book “America Revised,” if there is one thing to be said about American-history textbooks through the ages it is that the narrative of the past is consistently reshaped by present-day forces. Maybe the most striking thing about current history textbooks is that they have lost a controlling narrative. America is no longer portrayed as one thing, one people, but rather a hodgepodge of issues and minorities, forces and struggles. If it were possible to cast the concerns of the Christian conservatives into secular terms, it might be said that they find this lack of a through line and purpose to be disturbing and dangerous. Many others do as well, of course. But the Christians have an answer.

Their answer is rather specific. Merely weaving important religious trends and events into the narrative of American history is not what the Christian bloc on the Texas board has pushed for in revising its guidelines. Many of the points that have been incorporated into the guidelines or that have been advanced by board members and their expert advisers slant toward portraying America as having a divinely preordained mission. In the guidelines — which will be subjected to further amendments in March and then in May — eighth-grade history students are asked to “analyze the importance of the Mayflower Compact, the Fundamental Orders of Connecticut and the Virginia House of Burgesses to the growth of representative government.” Such early colonial texts have long been included in survey courses, but why focus on these in particular? The Fundamental Orders of Connecticut declare that the state was founded “to maintain and preserve the liberty and purity of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus.” The language in the Mayflower Compact — a document that McLeroy and several others involved in the Texas process are especially fond of — describes the Pilgrims’ journey as being “for the Glory of God and advancement of the Christian Faith” and thus instills the idea that America was founded as a project for the spread of Christianity. In a book she wrote two years ago, Cynthia Dunbar, a board member, could not have been more explicit about this being the reason for the Mayflower Compact’s inclusion in textbooks; she quoted the document and then said, “This is undeniably our past, and it clearly delineates us as a nation intended to be emphatically Christian.”

In the new guidelines, students taking classes in U.S. government are asked to identify traditions that informed America’s founding, “including Judeo-Christian (especially biblical law),” and to “identify the individuals whose principles of law and government institutions informed the American founding documents,” among whom they include Moses. The idea that the Bible and Mosaic law provided foundations for American law has taken root in Christian teaching about American history. So when Steven K. Green, director of the Center for Religion, Law and Democracy at Willamette University in Salem, Ore., testified at the board meeting last month in opposition to the board’s approach to bringing religion into history, warning that the Supreme Court has forbidden public schools from “seeking to impress upon students the importance of particular religious values through the curriculum,” and in the process said that the founders “did not draw on Mosaic law, as is mentioned in the standards,” several of the board members seemed dumbstruck. Don McLeroy insisted it was a legitimate claim, since the Enlightenment took place in Europe, in a Christian context. Green countered that the Enlightenment had in fact developed in opposition to reliance on biblical law and said he had done a lengthy study in search of American court cases that referenced Mosaic law. “The record is basically bereft,” he said. Nevertheless, biblical law and Moses remain in the TEKS.

The process in Texas required that writing teams, made up mostly of teachers, do the actual work of revising the curriculum, with the aid of experts who were appointed by the board. Two of the six experts the board chose are well-known advocates for conservative Christian causes. One of them, the Rev. Peter Marshall, says on the Web site of his organization, Peter Marshall Ministries, that his work is “dedicated to helping to restore America to its Bible-based foundations through preaching, teaching and writing on America’s Christian heritage and on Christian discipleship and revival.”

“The guidelines in Texas were seriously deficient in bringing out the role of the Christian faith in the founding of America,” Marshall told me. In a document he prepared for the team that was writing the new guidelines, he urged that new textbooks mold children’s impressions of the founders in particular ways: “The Founding Fathers’ biblical worldview taught them that human beings were by nature self-centered, so they believed that the supernatural influence of the Spirit of God was needed to free us from ourselves so that we can care for our neighbors.”

Marshall also proposed that children be taught that the separation-of-powers notion is “rooted in the Founding Fathers’ clear understanding of the sinfulness of man,” so that it was not safe for one person to exercise unlimited power, and that “the discovery, settling and founding of the colonies happened because of the biblical worldviews of those involved.” Marshall recommended that textbooks present America’s founding and history in terms of motivational stories on themes like the Pilgrims’ zeal to bring the Gospel of Jesus Christ to the natives.

One recurring theme during the process of revising the social-studies guidelines was the desire of the board to stress the concept of American exceptionalism, and the Christian bloc has repeatedly emphasized that Christianity should be portrayed as the driving force behind what makes America great. Peter Marshall is himself the author of a series of books that recount American history with a strong Christian focus and that have been staples in Christian schools since the first one was published in 1977. (He told me that they have sold more than a million copies.) In these history books, he employs a decidedly unhistorical tone in which the guiding hand of Providence shapes America’s story, starting with the voyage of Christopher Columbus. “Columbus’s heart belonged to God,” he assures his readers, and he notes that a particular event in the explorer’s life “marked the turning point of God’s plan to use Columbus to raise the curtain on His new Promised Land.”

The other nonacademic expert, David Barton, is the nationally known leader of WallBuilders, which describes itself as dedicated to “presenting America’s forgotten history and heroes, with an emphasis on our moral, religious and constitutional heritage.” Barton has written and lectured on the First Amendment and against separation of church and state. He is a controversial figure who has argued that the U.S. income tax and the capital-gains tax should be abolished because they violate Scripture (for the Bible says, in Barton’s reading, “the more profit you make the more you are rewarded”) and who pushes a Christianity-first rhetoric. When the 

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The New Venue for Last Days End Times (Wk1)-Michael James Stone


The New Venue for Last Days End Times

What we are looking forward to is as important as Who

Millions of people act upon emotional response to “End Times” News. They often “react” to the latest “buzz” or “knee-jerk” response to a “Web Site” or “Author” or Prophecy Seminar Series, or just plain headlines that most do not know How or If  those “Posts, Blogs, Articles, Books and Videos” are:

Facts or Fancy

Most of us “Want to Believe”. But with the “Cry Wolf” syndrome, we wind up with frayed emotions. We get told “too many times” this “NEW DISCOVERY” makes a “BETTER UNDERSTANDING” on Last Days Teachings: We Wind Up With The Latest Greatest Show On Earth. The punch line “Always comes in”: 1) Send me Money. 2) Buy my Book  3) Click my Link (Ads) 4) Pay to go to my prophecy seminar. 5) Get “my” materials. 6) Make me famous. 7) Support my political agenda

NO

We Look Forward to Jesus so we prepare to meet Him.

This New Venue Allows you to Compare Bible Scholars and Learn from them in an Orderly Way. We post from different web sites “learning foundations” that allow you to know WHY you don’t buy into the latest political blogger using Prophecy as a blanket for politics.

We choose the fear of the Lord, so you don’t run out and spend money you don’t have to on Seminars you probably aren’t going to “hear” anything new. But you will get “buzzed” to Spend and Listen. If you get hyped, you will spend, and Prophecy Scamming is Money in the Bank. We won’t go there.

News is important as a very very very SMALL PART of pieces of Jesus Coming, so we have a separate sight to Filter the facts from the Phoney Headlines: If it is Worthy, we will post it onward. If not, you can look at all the ‘Canned’ News meant to Overwhelm you.

This will be our recommended Logo for News:

We will try to be sensitive, but we will also post this logo on Wasted Space:

Today we began. The Web sites are upward coming and growing. You will see the OTY: <Prefix. This Stands For “One Thousand Years” It has the Foundational Facts you learn weekly. More sites will be listed next week as well.

This Week End starts with 10 Sages of Prophecy on the Book of Revelation to get you solidly grounded in Scripture and WHO we are looking for in the months ahead.

Each week-end, the “Family of the Last Generation” Sites will have new material and I will comment here as a lead into the posts we do on Saturday: OTY, with the above logo Watch and Be ready and End the Ten Posts of OTY on Saturday with a Summary that will include compliments:

I want to congratulate Bible Prophecy Today on more material this week on Prophecy Oriented Issues and Digest. While it had been on a spat of Political Posts, and likely will return somewhat to it, I see this site as crucial to Pray For and support as “BlogTalk” has become “TrashTalk” and Web sites like BPT are Leaders much like the deteriorating WND used to be.

It is Hoped WND would repent, but it is primarily a Trash Talk, “talk radio” Blagoblog. It earned our “Bla Bla Bla” Award for Blogs on the birther fallacy.

As this goes forward, you will see development.

But more than that,

You will see Jesus Soon and Hear His Voice.

You will, I promise that,

The Prophetic Perspective

Prove All Things knowing that all Prophecy is about Jesus and God revealing His Son…To us..for our…Salvation. We post material that is questionable, objectionable, and in the opinion of the Editor of the Prophetic Perspective, valid to use as God chooses to. Sometimes that is highly suspect as material setting “dates” of the Rapture is, but often these posts, may have pieces that are correct to futher study.  

“Rarely is anyone ALL RIGHT or ALL WRONG”

Michael James Stone

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OTY: The Revelation"Intro"(1A) -RevelationCommentary

OTY: The Revelation"Intro"(1A) -RevelationCommentary

Posted on 12:19 PM by Michael James Stone

OTY: The Revelation"Intro"(1A) -RevelationCommentary


A BENEFICIAL STUDY TOOL

Welcome to revelationcommentary.org! We hope this dynamiccommentary is a beneficial study tool in your devotion to the Word of God. Before beginning to go through the content of Revelation, we recommend that you read through the introductionoverview, andhermeneutical sections to familiarize yourself with the framework concerning this incredible book of God.


CONTRIBUTORS

Robert Van Kampen - (1938-1999) Author of numerous eschatological books and Founder of Sola Scriptura and The Sign Ministries, was a graduate of Wheaton College, a leading Christian businessman, co-founder of churches and missions agencies, and was founder of The Scriptorium. The Van Kampen Collection is the largest private collection of manuscripts, artifacts, scrolls and early printed editions of the Bible in the world today. He held an honorary doctoral degree in humane letters from Indiana Wesleyan University.


Rev. Bill Lee-Warner - (1946-2001) Bill was a graduate of Oregon State University, received his M.Div. from Western Evangelical Seminary, and pastored churches for more than twenty years. He served Sola Scriptura and The Sign Ministries as a writer, lecturer, and editor.


Rev. Charles Cooper - Instructor, Biblical Research & Education, Sola Scriptura, graduated from Ouachita Baptist University then went on to Dallas Theological Seminary and received a Master of Theology degree. After graduate school, Charles taught Homiletics and Hermeneutics at Moody Bible Institute for six and a half years. "Coop" (as he likes to be called) is active in declaring, defining, and defending the premillennial prewrath return of Christ. For any questions regarding this project please contact Charles by email or phone Sola Scriptura at 800.844.9930.


Gary Vaterlaus - Instructor, Biblical Research & Education, Sola Scriptura, a graduate of Oregon State University, Gary worked at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow before attending Western Conservative Baptist Seminary and starting a Christian publishing ministry in Russia. As an Instructor, Gary responds to correspondence and teaches the prewrath position nationwide.


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CONTENTS

Introduction
Overview of the Book of Revelation
Structure of the Book of Revelation
A Simple, Face Value Understanding of Prophetic Scriptures

"REVELATION BEGINS"

Chapter 1 - Prologue
Chapter 2 - The Seven Churches, Part 1
Chapter 3 - The Seven Churches, Part 2
Chapter 4 - Heaven
Chapter 5 - The Large Scroll
Chapter 6 - The First Six Seals

"PARENTHESIS I - RESCUED"

Chapter 7 - Deliverance

"THE DAY OF THE LORD"

Chapter 8 - Seventh Seal Events [Trumpet Judgments 1-4]
Chapter 9 - Completion of 70th Week [Trumpet Judgments 5-6]

"POST 70TH WEEK EVENTS"

Chapter 10 - The Little Scroll
Chapter 11 - Daniel 9:24 Completed [Trumpet Judgment 7]

"PARENTHESIS II - COSMIC CONFLICT HIGHLIGHTED"

Chapter 12 - The Beginning
Chapter 13 - The Beginning of the End
Chapter 14 - The End of the Beginning

A. Deliverance of the elect
B. Decree to the wicked
C. Destruction of the wicked

"THE DESTRUCTION OF ANTICHRIST- THE FINAL WRATH OF GOD"

Chapter 15 - Prelude to Bowl Judgments
Chapter 16 - Bowl Judgments 1-7

"PARENTHESIS III - DESTRUCTION HIGHLIGHTED"

Chapter 17 - The Great Harlot
Chapter 18 - The Great City
Chapter 19 - The Great Army

"THE MILLENNIAL REIGN OF CHRIST"

Chapter 20: 1-6 - The Beginning of the Millennium
Chapter 20:7-15 - The End of the Millennium

"THE CONCLUSION"

Chapter 21 - New Heavens, New Earth, New Jerusalem
Chapter 22 - Epilogue


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The Prophetic Perspective

Prove All Things knowing that all Prophecy is about Jesus and God revealing His Son…To us..for our…Salvation. We post material that is questionable, objectionable, and in the opinion of the Editor of the Prophetic Perspective, valid to use as God chooses to. Sometimes that is highly suspect as material setting “dates” of the Rapture is, but often these posts, may have pieces that are correct to futher study.  

“Rarely is anyone ALL RIGHT or ALL WRONG”

Michael James Stone

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                                      The simple format                                                                                      “the prophecy site just about prophecy”

This material was brought to you by Broadcast(B.C.)Christianity. Last Call Digest, is a ministry of Michael James Stone, volunteers, and people dedicated to the Love of God and Salvation of Souls. It is an aggragate of Christian Material selected to Bless you and Prepare you for each and every day you read them. May God Bless You as You Do!! Reading these Devotions will help you to prepare daily for life, living, and your Lord. You will hear God Speak To You thru them.  Jesus  is Coming Very Soon.

Broadcast(B.C.)Christianity, operates by you, with you, and for you. “Freely you have received, freely give”  Pass this on, everywhere you can, anytime you can, anyway you can. You will be blessed if you do.LastCallDigest@michaeljamesstone.com

This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner.

The material is being made available in an effort to understand scripture, news, technology and society especially as it relates to God and Jesus. It is specifically for non-profit research and educational purposes only. I believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use,' you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. This is a completely non-commercial site for private personal use. No fee is charged, and no money is made off of the operation of this site. Nor is any implied reciprocal gratuities implied or construed.

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OTY: The Revelation"Intro"(1A) - J. Vernon McGee

OTY: The Revelation"Intro"(1A) - J. Vernon McGee

Posted on 11:45 AM by Michael James Stone

OTY: The Revelation"Intro"(1A) - J. Vernon McGee

Click on J.Vernon McGee Revelation One (Audio)


Dr. J. Vernon McGee (1904-1988) is best known for his "Thru the Bible" radio programs which are broadcast around the globe in more than thirty-five different languages. He served as a pastor for over forty years and was also a teacher, lecturer, and author.


Dr. McGee was the author of more than two hundred books and booklets, including Ruth and Esther: Women of Faith, The Best of J. Vernon McGee, Thru the Bible with J. Vernon McGee (5-volume set), and the Thru the Bible Commentary Series (60-volume set). [From the back inside dust jacket of Questions and Answers, copyright 1990]


Dr. McGee's greatest pastorate was at the historic, Church of the Open Door in downtown Los Angeles, where he served from 1949 to 1970. Here he began a daily radio broadcast called "High Noon Bible Class" on a single station.


Dr. McGee began teaching Thru the Bible in 1967. After retiring from the pastorate, he set up radio headquarters in Pasadena, and the radio ministry expanded rapidly. Today the program airs on over 400 stations each day in the United States and Canada, is heard in more than 100 languages around the world and is broadcast worldwide via the Internet. 

   

The Prophetic Perspective

Prove All Things knowing that all Prophecy is about Jesus and God revealing His Son…To us..for our…Salvation. We post material that is questionable, objectionable, and in the opinion of the Editor of the Prophetic Perspective, valid to use as God chooses to. Sometimes that is highly suspect as material setting “dates” of the Rapture is, but often these posts, may have pieces that are correct to futher study.  

“Rarely is anyone ALL RIGHT or ALL WRONG”

Michael James Stone

Fair Use Notice

In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, any copyrighted work herein is archived under fair use without profit or payment to those who have expressed a prior interest in reviewing the included information for personal use, non-profit research and educational purposes only.

Last Days of the Last Generation                                “Last Generation”

                                      The simple format                                                                                      “the prophecy site just about prophecy”

This material was brought to you by Broadcast(B.C.)Christianity. Last Call Digest, is a ministry of Michael James Stone, volunteers, and people dedicated to the Love of God and Salvation of Souls. It is an aggragate of Christian Material selected to Bless you and Prepare you for each and every day you read them. May God Bless You as You Do!! Reading these Devotions will help you to prepare daily for life, living, and your Lord. You will hear God Speak To You thru them.  Jesus  is Coming Very Soon.

Broadcast(B.C.)Christianity, operates by you, with you, and for you. “Freely you have received, freely give”  Pass this on, everywhere you can, anytime you can, anyway you can. You will be blessed if you do.LastCallDigest@michaeljamesstone.com

This site contains copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner.

The material is being made available in an effort to understand scripture, news, technology and society especially as it relates to God and Jesus. It is specifically for non-profit research and educational purposes only. I believe this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. If you wish to use this copyrighted material for purposes of your own that go beyond 'fair use,' you must obtain permission from the copyright owner. This is a completely non-commercial site for private personal use. No fee is charged, and no money is made off of the operation of this site. Nor is any implied reciprocal gratuities implied or construed.

Posted via email from The Last Call Digest

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